E-Flora BC: Electronic Atlas of the Flora of British Columbia

Laccaria amethysteo-occidentalis G.M. Muell.
western amethyst Laccaria ('western amethyst Laccaria')
Hydnangiaceae

Species account author: Ian Gibson.
Extracted from Matchmaker: Mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest.

Introduction to the Macrofungi

© Jim Riley  Email the photographer   (Photo ID #52707)

E-Flora BC Static Map
Distribution of Laccaria amethysteo-occidentalis
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Species Information

Summary:
Features include hygrophanous, violet to brownish purple cap; sinuate well-spaced gills that are purple to lavender; long, dry, striate, purple violet stem with violet mycelium at base; mild odor and taste; growth under conifers; white spore deposit; and finely spiny spores that are nearly round to broadly elliptic. Laccaria amethysteo-occidentalis is common in the Pacific Northwest. Mueller(1) examined collections from BC, WA, OR, and CA. Oregon State University has a collection from ID.
Cap:
1-6.5(8.9)cm across, obtuse to convex to flat, often depressed, margin inrolled to decurved [downcurved] at first; hygrophanous, deep purple when fresh, fading to vinaceous, finally becoming buff; not striate when fresh, but sometimes translucent-striate on fading, finely fibrillose to fibrillose-scaly, (Mueller(1))
Flesh:
thin, concolorous with lighter gray purple to white areas intermixed; in stem colored as in cap, (Mueller(1)), violet (Phillips)
Gills:
sinuate to arcuate, subdistant to distant, narrow to broad, thick, occasionally waxy; dark violaceous, fading lighter (near "lavender" Ridgway(1) color), (Mueller(1))
Stem:
1.8-11.5cm x 0.3-1.2cm, equal to subclavate [somewhat club-shaped], occasionally slightly bulbous; purple, often with lighter violet to white scattered sectors, basal mycelium violet; dry, longitudinally striate, occasionally with recurved [upcurved] scales, (Mueller(1))
Odor:
not distinctive (Phillips)
Taste:
not distinctive (Phillips)
Microscopic spores:
spores (6.4)7.4-10.6 x 6.4-9.2 microns excluding ornamentation, nearly round to broadly elliptic, occasionally round or elliptic to almond-shaped, echinulate [spiny], echinulae < 0.5-1.4(1.8) microns long, (mean 1 +/- 0.3 microns), crowded, inamyloid, acyanophilic, hilar appendix 1.3-2 microns long, prominent, and truncate, plage present, occasionally one droplet; basidia 4-spored, 34-56.5 x 9.7-14.7 microns, clavate, elongate, colorless or in young specimens vinaceous brown in mass, sterigmata up to 9 microns long; pleurocystidia absent, cheilocystidia often abundant, extending well beyond basidia, 36.5-66.5 x 12-18.4 microns, subclavate to clavate, colorless, thin-walled, colorless, (Mueller(1)), spines on spores 1 micron wide at base, (Mueller(2))
Spore deposit:
white (Mueller(2))

Habitat / Range

scattered to gregarious under conifers, often Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas-fir), (Mueller(1)), fall, winter

Taxonomic and Nomenclatural Links


Genetic information (NCBI Taxonomy Database)
Taxonomic Information from the Missouri Botanical Garden
Index Fungorium
Taxonomic reference: Mycotaxon 20: 103-105. 1984 Mycotaxon 20(1): 103. 1984

Additional Range and Status Information Links

Edibility

yes (Phillips)

Additional Photo Sources

Related Databases

Species References

Mueller(1), Mueller(2), Arora(1)*, Phillips(1)*, Trudell(4)*, Sept(1)*, AroraPocket*

References for the fungi

General References