E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Wildlife of British Columbia

Chelifer cancroides L.
House Pseudoscorpion
Family: Cheliferidae


© Bryan Kelly-McArthur  Email the photographer   (Photo ID #78224)

E-Fauna BC Static Map
Distribution of Chelifer cancroides in British Columbia
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Introduction


The House Pseudoscorpion is a large cosmopolitan species that is frequently observed in houses (Levi 1948). Jacobs (2010) provides the following description: "The house pseudoscorpion adult is 3 to 4 millimeters in length and has a rich mahogany color. Its four pairs of legs increase sequentially in length. It has one eye on each side of its cephalothorax (head plus thorax) and a 12-segment abdomen (only ten are easily visible). Overall, the body resembles a teardrop. The pedipalps, located in front of the first pair of legs, are more than twice as long as the legs. When extended, crab-like, they measure 7 to 9 millimeters across."

Read about Pseudoscorpions in Canada.

A photographic key to the Pseudoscorpions of Canada and the Adjacent US, prepared by Christopher Buddle, is available.

Status Information

Origin StatusProvincial StatusBC List
(Red Blue List)
COSEWIC
UnlistedUnlistedUnlistedUnlisted
BC Ministry of Environment: BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer--the authoritative source for conservation information in British Columbia.

Synonyms and Alternate Names

Parachelifer muricatus (Say, 1821)

Additional Photo Sources

General References


Recommended citation: Author, Date. Page title. In Klinkenberg, Brian. (Editor) 2019. E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Fauna of British Columbia [efauna.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. [Accessed: 18/11/2019 3:31:31 PM]
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