E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Wildlife of British Columbia

Cypris pubera O. F. Müller, 1776
Seed Shrimp
Family: Cyprididae

© Ian Gardiner  Email the photographer   (Photo ID #74688)

E-Fauna BC Static Map
Distribution of Cypris pubera in British Columbia
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Introduction


Cypris pubera is a globally distributed freshwater ostracod species (Little 2005) that is reported from southern BC from the Thompson and Fraser drainages (Gardiner pers. comm. 2012). No male has been reported for this species; reproduction is asexual (it "reproduces through ameiotic parthenogenesis") (Little 2005).

Little provides additional information: "Cypris pubera also appears to exist in two morphological forms: a green morph and a brown one. All of the polyploids were of the green morph, while the brown morph appeared to be a diploid."

Status Information

Origin StatusProvincial StatusBC List
(Red Blue List)
COSEWIC
UnlistedUnlistedUnlistedUnlisted
BC Ministry of Environment: BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer--the authoritative source for conservation information in British Columbia.

Additional Photo Sources

Species References

Little, Tom J. 2005. Genetic diversity and polyploidy in the cosmopolitan asexual ostracod Cypris pubera. Journal of Plankton Reseach 27 (12): 1287-1293.

General References


Recommended citation: Author, Date. Page title. In Klinkenberg, Brian. (Editor) 2019. E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Fauna of British Columbia [efauna.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. [Accessed: 19/11/2019 1:47:31 AM]
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