E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Wildlife of British Columbia

Richardsonius balteatus (Richardson, 1836)
Redside Shiner
Family: Cyprinidae

© Ian Gardiner  Email the photographer   (Photo ID #8763)


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Source: Distribution map provided by Don McPhail for E-Fauna BC
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Species Information

Small minnow (typically <200 mm) with a deeply forked caudal fin; unusually high number of anal rays (10-22), deep, laterally compressed body; the origina of the dorsal fin lies well behind the origin of the pelvic fins. Refer to McPhail (2008) for a detailed description and discussion of similar species.
Source: McPail, J. D. 2008. The Freshwater Fishes of British Columbia. University of Alberta Press, Edmonton.

Biology

Species Biology

Inhabits runs and flowing to standing pools of headwaters, creeks, and small to medium rivers; lakes and ponds. Usually over mud or sand, often near vegetation. Occurs in schools (Ref. 1998). Fry feed on diatoms, copepods, ostracods, and other small planktonic and demersal crustaceans (Ref. 1998). Diet changes to terrestrial and aquatic insects, algae, mollusks, fish eggs (including their own), and small fishes like other redside shiners, other minnows, and trout (Ref. 1998). Preyed upon by mergansers, loons, and mink (Ref. 1998).

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p

Distribution

BC Distribution and Notes

The redside shiner is the most common minnow in B.C. Although its biology is relatively well known there are some things about the species that warrant further study. For example, there are consistent differences in body shape between riverine and lacustrine populations. How these differences affect habitat use is unknown.

Source: Information provided by Don McPhail for E-Fauna BC.
Global Distribution

North America: Pacific Slope drainages from Nass River in British Columbia, Canada to Rogue, Klamath and Columbia River drainages in Oregon, Idaho, Nevada and Wyoming, USA; Bonneville basin in southern Idaho, western Wyoming and Utah; Peace River system (Arctic basin) in British Columbia and Alberta, Canada.

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p
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Status Information

Origin StatusProvincial StatusBC List
(Red Blue List)
COSEWIC
NativeS5YellowNot Listed
BC Ministry of Environment: BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer--the authoritative source for conservation information in British Columbia.

Additional Range and Status Information Links

Additional Photo Sources

General References


Recommended citation: Author, Date. Page title. In Klinkenberg, Brian. (Editor) 2019. E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Fauna of British Columbia [efauna.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. [Accessed: 22/11/2019 1:19:50 PM]
Disclaimer: The information contained in an E-Fauna BC atlas pages is derived from expert sources as cited (with permission) in each section. This information is scientifically based.  E-Fauna BC also acts as a portal to other sites via deep links.  As always, users should refer to the original sources for complete information.  E-Fauna BC is not responsible for the accuracy or completeness of the original information.


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