E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Wildlife of British Columbia

Catostomus macrocheilus Girard, 1856
Largescale Sucker
Family: Catostomidae
Photo of species

© Jamie Fenneman  Email the photographer   (Photo ID #3210)


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Source: Distribution map provided by Don McPhail for E-Fauna BC
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Species Information

Large-scaled sucker (it usually has fewer than 75 scales along the lateral line) has 12-17 (usually 13-16) dorsal rays.In profile, the body tapers steeply back from the dorsal fin to the relatively narrow caudal peduncle (its depth usually less than half the width of the dorsal fin base). The snout is short when viewed from below, scarcely projects beyond the upper lip. For further information see McPhail (2007). (Source: McPhail, J. D. 2007. The Freshwater Fishes of British Columbia. The University of Alberta Press. 620 p.)
Source: McPail, J. D. 2008. The Freshwater Fishes of British Columbia. University of Alberta Press, Edmonton.

Biology

Species Biology

Occurs in pools and runs of medium to large rivers. Also found in lakes. Pelagic up to 1.8 cm in length (Ref. 1998). Young feed on planktonic cladocerans, copepods, ostracods, and mites; chironomid, trichopteran and ephemeropteran larvae; and bottom ooze (Ref. 1998). Adults feed on algae, diatoms, insects, amphipods, and mollusks (Ref. 1998). May feed on salmonid eggs (Ref. 1998). Preyed upon by mergansers, osprey, eagles, and bears (Ref. 1998).

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.

Distribution

BC Distribution and Notes

The largescale sucker probably is the most common sucker in the southern half of our province. It grows to a large size and appears to be morphologically and ecologically uniform over most of its B.C. range. In the summer, the population in Eagle Lake (Chilcotin) is reported to forage at the surface on emerging chironomids

Source: Information provided by Don McPhail for E-Fauna BC.
Global Distribution

North America: Arctic basin in Canada from Peace River drainage in British Columbia to Smokey River drainage in Alberta; Pacific Slope from Nass River in British Columbia to Snake River drainage (below Shoshone Falls) in Idaho and Nevada, USA, and Coquille River in Oregon, USA.

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.
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Status Information

Origin StatusProvincial StatusBC List
(Red Blue List)
COSEWIC
NativeS5YellowNot Listed
BC Ministry of Environment: BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer--the authoritative source for conservation information in British Columbia.

Additional Range and Status Information Links

Additional Photo Sources

General References


Recommended citation: Author, Date. Page title. In Klinkenberg, Brian. (Editor) 2021. E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Fauna of British Columbia [efauna.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. [Accessed: 2022-01-16 9:05:37 PM]
Disclaimer: The information contained in an E-Fauna BC atlas pages is derived from expert sources as cited (with permission) in each section. This information is scientifically based.  E-Fauna BC also acts as a portal to other sites via deep links.  As always, users should refer to the original sources for complete information.  E-Fauna BC is not responsible for the accuracy or completeness of the original information.


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