E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Wildlife of British Columbia

Culaea inconstans (Kirtland, 1840)
Brook Stickleback
Family: Gasterosteiformes
Photo of species

© Ian Gardiner  Email the photographer   (Photo ID #5827)


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Source: Distribution map provided by Don McPhail for E-Fauna BC
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Species Information

This is a smal fish with four to six short spines arranged in a straight row in front of the dorsal fin, and with the gill membranes free from the isthmus; it differs from other stickleback species in BC in dorsal spine number. For further information, refer to McPhail (2008).
Source: McPail, J. D. 2008. The Freshwater Fishes of British Columbia. University of Alberta Press, Edmonton.

Biology

Species Biology

Inhabits cool, vegetated, sand or mud bottoms of lakes and ponds. Also in pools and backwaters of creeks and small rivers (Ref. 1998, 10294). Rarely found in brackish water. Feeds on crustacean and insect larvae, eggs and larvae of fishes, snails, oligochaetes and algae (Ref. 1998, 10294). Preyed upon by kingfishers, herons, and mergansers and occasionally by fishes like Salvelinus fontinalis and Esox lucius (Ref. 1998).

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.

Distribution

BC Distribution and Notes

In B.C., the brook stickleback is found in the northeastern part of the province. It is extremely abundant in muskeg areas and occupies a number of major drainages (although they are all part of the Mackenzie River system). Elsewhere there are populations of this species that lack pelvic girdles and, eventually, this condition may turn up in B.C.

Source: Information provided by Don McPhail for E-Fauna BC.
Global Distribution

North America: Nova Scotia to Northwest Territories and eastern British Columbia in Canada; Great Lakes-Mississippi River basins south to southern Ohio and Nebraska in USA and west to Montana, USA. Isolated population in Canadian River system in northeastern New Mexico, USA.

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.
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Status Information

Origin StatusProvincial StatusBC List
(Red Blue List)
COSEWIC
NativeS5YellowNot Listed
BC Ministry of Environment: BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer--the authoritative source for conservation information in British Columbia.

Additional Range and Status Information Links

Additional Photo Sources

General References


Recommended citation: Author, Date. Page title. In Klinkenberg, Brian. (Editor) 2021. E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Fauna of British Columbia [efauna.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. [Accessed: 2022-05-27 5:22:19 AM]
Disclaimer: The information contained in an E-Fauna BC atlas pages is derived from expert sources as cited (with permission) in each section. This information is scientifically based.  E-Fauna BC also acts as a portal to other sites via deep links.  As always, users should refer to the original sources for complete information.  E-Fauna BC is not responsible for the accuracy or completeness of the original information.


© E-Fauna BC 2021: An initiative of the Spatial Data Lab, Department of Geography, UBC