E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Wildlife of British Columbia

Enoplognatha ovata (Clerck, 1757)
Cobweb Weaver
Family: Theridiidae

Photo of species

© Ian Lane  Email the photographer   (Photo ID #1565)

E-Fauna BC Static Map
Distribution of Enoplognatha ovata in British Columbia
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Introduction


Wikipedia provides the following information for this species: "It is native to Europe and has also been introduced to North America. This spider, reaching a length of 6 mm (excluding legs), has translucent legs and the globular abdomen is extremely variable in colour and pattern: the background colour is white, cream or green and can be marked with a row of dark spots, a broad red stripe or with two red stripes in a v-shape. Despite its small size, this is a formidable predator which can prey on insects many times its size. The female deposits its eggs in a grey sac. This is secreted within a rolled-up leaf fastened with silk and the female guards it until the eggs hatch." (Wikipedia 2011).

Status Information

Origin StatusProvincial StatusBC List
(Red Blue List)
COSEWIC
ExoticSNAExoticNot Listed
BC Ministry of Environment: BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer--the authoritative source for conservation information in British Columbia.

Additional Photo Sources

General References


Recommended citation: Author, Date. Page title. In Klinkenberg, Brian. (Editor) 2021. E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Fauna of British Columbia [efauna.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. [Accessed: 2022-01-25 9:28:27 PM]
Disclaimer: The information contained in an E-Fauna BC atlas pages is derived from expert sources as cited (with permission) in each section. This information is scientifically based.  E-Fauna BC also acts as a portal to other sites via deep links.  As always, users should refer to the original sources for complete information.  E-Fauna BC is not responsible for the accuracy or completeness of the original information.


© E-Fauna BC 2021: An initiative of the Spatial Data Lab, Department of Geography, UBC