E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Wildlife of British Columbia

Mylocheilus caurinus (Richardson, 1836)
Peamouth
Family: Cyprinidae
Photo of species

© Tim Loh  Email the photographer   (Photo ID #94360)


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Source: Distribution map provided by Don McPhail for E-Fauna BC
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Species Information

A large minnow (adults reaching lengths of over 250 mm), with a small mouth, and barbels at the corners of the upper jaws; the dorsal fin originates in front of the pelvic fins; in juveniles the caudal fin is asymmetrical and deeply forked; adults have two dark banks on the flanks. Females are larger than males. For detailed description and discusion of this species, refer to McPhail (2008).

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.

Biology

Species Biology

Adults form schools in lakes and slow-flowing areas of small and medium rivers. Most common around vegetation. Can withstand brackish waters for a limited period (Ref. 1998). Newly hatched individuals school near the shore, moving into deeper water in the summer (Ref. 4569). Feed mainly on aquatic insects and its larvae and some terrestrial insects (Ref. 10288); but also on planktonic crustaceans, mollusks, and small fishes (Ref. 1998). Preyed upon by fish-eating birds and mammals (Ref. 1998)

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.

Distribution

BC Distribution and Notes

The peamouth is the only primary freshwater fish on Vancouver Island and the Sechelt Peninsula. Its presence on both the west and east coasts of Vancouver Island is a minor biogeographic puzzle that probably could be solved with a microsatellite study. On the mainland, peamouth normally occur with a suite of minnows and suckers with which it has co-evolved. These fish are absent on Vancouver Island. Consequently, the peamouth on Vancouver Island or the Sechelt Peninsula might make an interesting study in ecological release.

Source: Information provided by Don McPhail for E-Fauna BC.
Global Distribution

North America: Nass (Pacific Slope) and Peace River (Arctic basin) systems in British Columbia, Canada south to Columbia River drainage in Oregon

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.
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Taxonomy


Occasional hybrids between peamouth and redside shiners are known from several localities in the Fraser, Columbia, and Skeen drainages.

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.

Status Information

Origin StatusProvincial StatusBC List
(Red Blue List)
COSEWIC
NativeS5YellowNot Listed
BC Ministry of Environment: BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer--the authoritative source for conservation information in British Columbia.

Additional Range and Status Information Links

Additional Photo Sources

General References


Recommended citation: Author, Date. Page title. In Klinkenberg, Brian. (Editor) 2021. E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Fauna of British Columbia [efauna.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. [Accessed: 2022-01-24 2:53:08 AM]
Disclaimer: The information contained in an E-Fauna BC atlas pages is derived from expert sources as cited (with permission) in each section. This information is scientifically based.  E-Fauna BC also acts as a portal to other sites via deep links.  As always, users should refer to the original sources for complete information.  E-Fauna BC is not responsible for the accuracy or completeness of the original information.


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