E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Wildlife of British Columbia

Ptychocheilus oregonensis (Richardson, 1836)
Northern Pikeminnow
Family: Cyprinidae
Photo of species

© Tim Loh  Email the photographer   (Photo ID #123461)


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Source: Distribution map provided by Don McPhail for E-Fauna BC
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Species Information

Dorsal soft rays (total): 9 - 10; Anal soft rays: 8 - 9; Vertebrae: 44 - 46. Mot deep bodied, greatest depth 16.6% (TL), belly gently rounded in mature individuals. Head moderately long, its length 22.8% (TL); eye small in adults, 17.6% of head length, but larger in young 7.6 cm long, when 25.2% of head length; snout long, 33.1% of head length of adults; interorbital width 29.6% of head length; mouth large, extending back to below anterior margin of eye. All fins clear. Pelvic axillary process usually a ridge. Peritoneum present. Nuptial tubercles fine, on head and back, on pectoral and pelvic fins and sometimes on the caudal fin. Dark green or green-brown dorsally becoming silvery white or cream ventrally. The lower fins of the males become yellow or yellow-orange during spawning period.

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.

Biology

Species Biology

Occurs in lakes, ponds and occasionally in runs of small to large rivers. Feeds on fishes, terrestrial insects, plankton, aquatic insect larvae, and crustaceans while inshore; feeds mostly on fishes while offshore (Ref. 1998). Male Pikeminnows, Prickly Sculpins, and newts prey on the eggs (Ref. 1998).

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.

Distribution

BC Distribution and Notes

The northern pike minnow is a much-maligned fish. Biologically it is something of an anomaly — a large, predaceous minnow. Its biology has been reasonably well studied but always with the aim of “controlling” its numbers. The “dwarf” pikeminnows in some lakes on the Bonaparte Plateau may be unique to B.C., but are probably stunted introduced populations

Source: Information provided by Don McPhail for E-Fauna BC.
Global Distribution

North America: Pacific drainages from Nass River in British Columbia, Canada to Columbia River in Nevada, USA; Harney River basin in Oregon, USA; Peace River system (Arctic basin) in British Columbia and Alberta, Canada.

Source: FishBase. Page, L.M. and B.M. Burr 1991 A field guide to freshwater fishes of North America north of Mexico. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston. 432 p.
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Status Information

Origin StatusProvincial StatusBC List
(Red Blue List)
COSEWIC
NativeS5YellowNot Listed
BC Ministry of Environment: BC Species and Ecosystems Explorer--the authoritative source for conservation information in British Columbia.

Additional Range and Status Information Links

Additional Photo Sources

General References


Recommended citation: Author, Date. Page title. In Klinkenberg, Brian. (Editor) 2021. E-Fauna BC: Electronic Atlas of the Fauna of British Columbia [efauna.bc.ca]. Lab for Advanced Spatial Analysis, Department of Geography, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. [Accessed: 2022-06-26 1:16:38 PM]
Disclaimer: The information contained in an E-Fauna BC atlas pages is derived from expert sources as cited (with permission) in each section. This information is scientifically based.  E-Fauna BC also acts as a portal to other sites via deep links.  As always, users should refer to the original sources for complete information.  E-Fauna BC is not responsible for the accuracy or completeness of the original information.


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